November 28, 2015


This is a special report done in conjunction with GBTV. The issue was explored in detail on The Glenn Beck Program Tuesday, April 17. 

Did Nebraska Sen. Ben Nelson and Warren Buffett Help Obama Kill Keystone Pipeline to Benefit Burlington Northern Railroad?As the nation’s gas prices skyrocket, critics argue that President Obama’s recent rejection of the $7 billion, “shovel-ready” Keystone XL oil pipeline, followed by his continued vow to “double down” on green energy, is a clear sign the administration plans to do little of substance in terms of American oil exploration. The move has also stirred controversy about the president’s real intentions concerning job creation and reducing pain at the pump for everyday Americans. But could there be a more sinister reason behind denying the pipeline’s requisite permits — namely, to benefit billionaire Obama-supporter Warren Buffett?

The evidence does seem to be mounting.

Background on TransCanada’s Keystone XL oil pipeline 

By now, most are likely familiar with the controversy surrounding the Keystone XL oil pipeline intended to transport crude oil from Alberta, Canada all the way to Texas’ Gulf Coast. The administration rejected permits to construct the northern portion of the pipeline, allegedly on the basis of “environmental concerns,” along with a purported lack of time to investigate said issues.

Adding salt to the wound, in March, Obama visited Cushing, Oklahoma, site of the world’s largest oil storage complex, to take credit for “approving” the stretch of pipeline construction that was already underway there. While Obama used the tour to prop up his administrations’ energy policy, TransCanada actually gained approvals to build the southern stretch of its pipeline months prior to Obama’s arrival in Oklahoma, and did so through no help of the president. As Forbes pointed out, pipelines that stay within U.S. borders are not subject to presidential approval like ones running from Canada into the U.S.


Regarding the northern portion, TransCanada filed an initial application to build the 1,179-mile underground pipeline in 2008, passing two State Department reviews and in February 2010, South Dakota Public Utilities Commission (PUC) granted a permit based on a thorough work up of the project.

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