September 24, 2021

Graham, Van Hollen announce new Turkey sanctions | TheHill

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Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamMurkowski warns against rushing to conclusions on Trump impeachment Syrian Democratic Forces official warns of ‘humanitarian catastrophe’ ahead of expected Turkish operation Turkey says it will cross into Syria ‘shortly,’ issues warning to Kurdish fighters MORE (R-S.C.) and Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenGraham vows ‘sanctions from hell’ if Turkey moves into Syria Overnight Defense: Republicans urge Trump to reverse course on Syria | Dems subpoena Pentagon in impeachment probe | North Korea talks falter Graham, Van Hollen pledge bipartisan sanctions on Turkey if it attacks Kurds MORE (D-Md.) on Wednesday announced that they have reached an agreement on new sanctions against Turkey after the country launched a military operation in northern Syria.

“I am pleased to have reached a bipartisan agreement with Senator @ChrisVanHollen on severe sanctions against Turkey for their invasion of Syria,” Graham said in a tweet announcing the deal.

He added that “while the Administration refuses to act against Turkey, I expect strong bipartisan support. …Most Members of Congress believe it would be wrong to abandon the Kurds who have been strong allies against ISIS.” 

I am pleased to have reached a bipartisan agreement with Senator @ChrisVanHollen on severe sanctions against Turkey for their invasion of Syria.

While the Administration refuses to act against Turkey, I expect strong bipartisan support. pic.twitter.com/Ph5fIVt7k3

— Lindsey Graham (@LindseyGrahamSC) October 9, 2019

The deal between the two senators comes after they announced on Monday that they were working on sanctions legislation in the wake of Trump’s decision to yank U.S. troops out of northern Syria ahead of a planned Turkish military operation.

Turkey began airstrikes and shelling against Kurdish forces in northern Syria on Wednesday and, hours later, moved ground troops into the country after Trump pulled back U.S. troops.

The sanctions bill, according to a fact sheet shared by Graham, would sanction any U.S. assets of Turkish leadership, including Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.

The bill would also target Turkey’s energy sector and military, including sanctions against “any foreign person who sells or provides financial, material, or technological support or knowingly does a transaction with Turkish military.”

It would also prohibit U.S military sales to Turkey and restrict the ability for Turkey’s leadership to travel to the United States.

“Today @LindseyGrahamSC and I are announcing a framework for sanctions against Turkey to respond to their military operation in northeastern Syria, which is already underway. These sanctions will have immediate, far-reaching consequences for Erdogan and his military,” Van Hollen added in a tweet.  

Our bill includes sanctions on:

→ Turkey’s political leadership

→ Military transactions with Turkey

→ Turkey’s domestic energy sector

It will also:

→ Prohibit U.S. military support for Turkey

→ Trigger 2017 CAATSA sanctions

→ Restrict U.S. visas for Turkish leadership https://t.co/nugcPRlMFD

— Chris Van Hollen (@ChrisVanHollen) October 9, 2019

Trump is facing fierce backlash from both sides of the aisle for his decision to pull U.S. troops out of northern Syria. Lawmakers warn that it could bolster the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and endanger the Kurds, who have allied with the United States to fight the terrorist organization. 

Trump distanced himself from Turkey’s military operation earlier Wednesday and indicated that he would support additional sanctions.  

“I think Lindsey would like to stay there for the next 200 years and maybe add a couple a hundred of thousand people every place, but I disagree with Lindsey on that,” Trump told reporters at the White House. “But I will tell you that I do agree on sanctions, but I actually think much tougher than sanctions if [Erdogan] doesn’t do it in as humane a way as possible.”

Under the bill, sanctions against Turkey would remain in effect until the administration certifies to lawmakers that Ankara has withdrawn its forces from Syria. 









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Jordain Carney
The Hill

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