January 26, 2022

Blue States Lead in Daily Average of Coronavirus Cases per Capita

Blue states currently lead the U.S. in the daily average of coronavirus cases per capita, according to Saturday’s data.

According to the New York Times’ coronavirus tracker, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Washington, DC, lead the U.S. in the daily average of coronavirus cases per capita. Rhode Island currently stands at 413 per 100,000, followed by New York with 362 and New Jersey with 351. 

Massachusetts is reporting 289 cases per capita, followed by D.C., which led the country mere weeks ago, reporting 280. All of those figures are above the U.S. average of 195 cases per 100,000. 

That comes despite the fact that several areas, such as New York and Washington, DC, have reintroduced mandates in the wake of the omicron variant of the virus. 

“Multiple sources of now preliminary data indicate a decreased severity with Omicron,” Fauci said during a White House COVID-19 Response Team press briefing this week, although he argued that it is not time to end mandates and restrictions:

We should not be complacent since the increased transmissibility of …  Omicron might be overridden by the sheer volume of the number of cases that may be of reduced severity but could still stress our hospital system, because a certain proportion of a large volume of cases, no matter what, are going to be severe.

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Anthony Fauci prepares to testify before the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee about the ongoing response to the COVID-19 pandemic in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill on November 04, 2021 in Washington, DC. Senators questioned Fauci and other witnesses about the approval of the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine for children between 5 and 11 years old this week. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Anthony Fauci prepares to testify before the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee about the ongoing response to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

“So, don’t take this as a signal that we can pull back from the recommendations that you just heard from Dr. Walensky about the need for vaccination, for boostering, for wearing masks, and all the other CDC recommendations,” he added.

Similarly, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) director Rochelle Walensky said that people need to “get vaccinated and get boosted if you are eligible, wear a mask, stay home when you’re sick, and take a test if you have symptoms or are looking for greater, extra reassurance before you gather with others.”

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