January 26, 2022

Sen. Elizabeth Warren Attacks Republican ‘Opponents of Democracy’ on January 6 Anniversary

U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) attacked Republican “opponents of democracy,” in a speech on the Senate floor on the eve of the January 6 Capitol riot anniversary.

“Today, Republican opponents of democracy are exploiting every possible avenue to allow their party to maintain control,” Warren said. The Massachusetts senator also commemorated the “sacrifices” made by Capitol Police to “protect our Democracy.”

I’m speaking on the Senate floor to reflect on the insurrection at our Capitol on January 6th one year ago, and the need to defend our democracy: https://t.co/2PQ7K93Ik8

— Elizabeth Warren (@SenWarren) January 5, 2022

“The January 6 insurrection made painfully clear that American democracy is seriously at risk,” she added.

Warren also used her time on the Senate floor to call on the Senate to pass a voting rights legislation package in light of the federal judiciary and state legislatures’ alleged “all-out assault against free and fair elections in America.”

“The Senate must not turn a blind eye while the federal judiciary and state legislatures lead an all-out assault against free and fair elections in America. It’s clear that Donald Trump’s Republican Party is embracing an increasingly authoritarian movement,” she added.

Warren’s call for voting rights confirms recent reports that revealed congressional Democrats intend to use the January 6 anniversary as a catalyst for passing voting rights legislation.

U.S Attorney General Merrick Garland also called on Congress to pass voting rights legislation on Wednesday. “It is essential for Congress to act to give the Department the powers we need to ensure that every eligible voter can cast a vote that counts,” the Attorney General said.

Democrats face trouble surpassing the 60-vote threshold required to overcome a Republican filibuster. In her speech, Warren also called for an end to the filibuster. This longtime Senate procedure allows a senator to prolong debate and delay legislative proceedings on a particular matter.

Democratic presidential candidates Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., left, and former Vice President Joe Biden talk during a break Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, in a Democratic presidential primary debate hosted by ABC at Texas Southern University in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Democratic presidential candidates Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and former Vice President Joe Biden talk during a break Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, in a Democratic presidential primary debate hosted by ABC at Texas Southern University in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

“It is time to end the filibuster, time to protect voting rights, and time to defend our democracy,” said Warren. “My view on this is simple. We did not swear an oath to protect a procedural rule like the filibuster, which has been the tool of racial segregation and Jim Crow.”

“No. We swore an oath to defend the Constitution. When the Senate rules stand in the way of voting rights legislation, then those Senate rules must change,” she said.

As the Democrats commemorate the first anniversary of January 6, Republican politicians will have their response to the Democrats. Although former President Donald Trump canceled a press conference scheduled for January 6, House Republican Reps. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) and Marjorie Taylor-Greene (R-GA) will hold a “Republican response” on January 6.

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